For the third iteration of WPA-organized presentations at the Shinola store on 14th Street NW, Natalie Cheung presents "Rock. Paper. Scissors.," a large vinyl mural. Natalie was recently profiled on Shinola's blog "The Journal."

Published on Shinola's "The Journal," on July 21, 2016

Chance occurences that happen in nature are what drive artist Natalie Cheung to create new artwork. Her latest art installation can be found inside our Washington D.C. store (1631 14th St. NW). At 8 x 12 feet, this work is the largest piece of artwork she's ever shown. We sat down with Natalie to ask what it was like creating this masterpiece.

Join us at our in-store event to meet Natalie July 27 from 6-8 p.m. at our Logan Square store. Enjoy sips, snacks and a talk from the artist. No RSVP is needed.

Natalie Cheung's artwork inside our D.C. store.

How long have you been a contemporary artist? Please describe your work’s aesthetic.

Growing up in the DC area, I had a lot of exposure to museums and the arts programs, and I’ve always been drawn to visually interesting and creative activities.  I am formally educated as a fine art photographer with a BFA from the Corcoran College of Art + Design, and a MFA from Tyler School of Art, Temple University. Ever since my schooling, I have been a working artist.

What inspires you to create and where do you feel most inspired?

A lot of my work is framed around chance occurrence that exist in nature, so I always feel compelled to make new artwork after taking a long hike or being exposed to new kinds of natural environments. I’m inspired by the small details and flaws in nature, and how together, they build a larger picture of the world we live in.

Natalie Cheung.

Describe your artwork that’s inside of our D.C. Store. What is it called and how did you create it?

At 8 x 12 feet, the work I have in the Shinola D.C. store is the largest artwork I have ever shown. I saw this as an opportunity to create a somewhat experimental installation. The black and white image is of a paper cut photogram (a camera-less photographic darkroom technique) I had cut.

The Rock Paper Scissors series is a blending of my cultural upbringing and my observations as a formally educated photographer. The idea of creating my own take on my mother's intricate Chinese New Year paper-cuts photographically came to me when I saw a photograph of a city apartment building in a full black silhouette. The image was of an apartment facade, but completely abstracted at the same time. My paper cut compositions are spontaneous and intuitive shapes similar to those found in nature and man-made structures.

Date

July 21, 2016

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